Drinking more than 2 soft drinks a day doubles the risk of developing two types of diabetes


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Drinking more than 2 soft drinks a day doubles the risk of developing two types of diabetes, as per a study published recently in European Journal of Endocrinology.

Researchers say this applies to soft drinks that are artificially sweetened as well as those containing sugar.

Here is the abstract of the study.

Objective: Sweetened beverage intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but its association with autoimmune diabetes is unclear. We aimed to investigate sweetened beverage intake and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA); autoimmune diabetes with features of type 2 diabetes.

Design/methods: Data from a Swedish population-based study was used, including incident cases of LADA (n = 357) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1136) and randomly selected controls (n = 1371). Diabetes classification was based on onset age (≥35), glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) and C-peptide. Sweetened beverage intake information was derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire. ORs adjusted for age, sex, family history of diabetes, education, lifestyle, diet, energy intake and BMI were estimated using logistic regression.

Results: Daily intake of >2 servings of sweetened beverages (consumed by 6% of participants) was associated with increased risk of LADA (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.11–3.56), and for each 200 mL daily serving, OR was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02–1.29). Findings were similar for sugar-sweetened (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00–1.39) and artificially sweetened beverages (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.95–1.32). Similarly, each daily serving increment in total sweetened beverage conferred 20% higher type 2 diabetes risk (95% CI: 1.07–1.34). In type 2 diabetes patients, high consumers displayed higher HOMA-IR levels (4.5 vs 3.5, P = 0.0002), but lower HOMA-B levels (55 vs 70, P = 0.0378) than non-consumers. Similar tendencies were seen in LADA.

Conclusions: High intake of sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of LADA. The observed relationship resembled that with type 2 diabetes, suggesting common pathways possibly involving insulin resistance